Chinh Ho

Photo of Chinh Ho

BE (Hons) HCMUT; ME Nagoya; PhD Sydney
Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Rm 109
H73 - 378 Abercrombie Street
The University of Sydney
NSW 2006 Australia

Telephone +61 2 9114 1892
Fax +61 2 9114 1863
chinh.ho@sydney.edu.au
Curriculum vitae Curriculum vitae

Bio

Chinh Ho is a Senior Research Fellow in Transport Economics and Transport Planning. Acting as a member of scientific and technical committee, Chinh has provided strategic and operational advices on urban and regional planning, including economic analysis of transport infrastructure projects in Vietnam, urban mobility for developing world, and bus services in NSW.

Chinh completed his PhD in 2013 on intra-household interactions and group decisions in travel mode choice, with a particular focus on planning strategies and segments of car users to encourage the use of more sustainable travel modes. At ITLS, Chinh involves in the development of a new version of the Transportation and Environment Strategy Impact Simulator (TRESIS) and other projects focusing on the use of stated choice experiments to study individual and group choices, and heuristics in travel behaviour. Chinh was awarded the John H Taplin Prize for the best paper presented at the Australasian Transport Research Forum 2012, the Innovation Grant from World Conference on Transport Research 2013 and the Michael Beesley Award for the best paper presented to Thredbo 2013 by early career researchers. Chinh also holds a Bachelor of Civil Engineering with first class Honours in Bridge and Highway Engineering from Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, Vietnam where he was a full-time lecturer. Before joining ITLS, Chinh obtained a masters degree in Transport Planning from Nagoya University, Japan and led an infrastructure team at NewCC Construction and Consultant firm.

Research Interests

Chinh’s research interests cover four main areas: (1) integrated land use and transport planning (ILUT), (2) spatial analysis of big data, (3) emerging transport technologies such as mobility as a service (MaaS) and driverless vehicles, (4) modelling group decisions. Regarding ILUT research, Chinh’s work on developing MetroScan software in the last five years has opened a new way to apply modelling advancements to predict travel demand, and contributed to transforming the way in which transport initiatives are identified and prioritised. MetroScan software incorporates many themes in transport and logistics research, from advanced disaggregate modelling and integrated transport-land use, to traffic assignments and big data. It is a unique planning tool that can deliver in a timely manner, vital demand forecasts and a detailed assessment of the benefits, costs and economic impacts of transport initiatives such that a transparent assessment of many potentially valuable initiatives associated with networks, projects and policies can be executed. Transport for NSW and the industry has used MetroScan for real-world projects.

Chinh has a strong research interest in Big Data, especially the spatial element of it and how Big Data can be used to further our understanding and optimising of the flow of goods and transactions along the supply chains. He has conducted several commissioned projects that have involved real big data such as Google, mobile-phone providers and smart-card collection systems such as Opal.

Digital disruption is expected to be the next transport ‘revolution’ with the imminent introduction of new mobility services and self-driving vehicles. This digitally supported transport revolution will undoubtedly impact many aspects of our lives, directly and indirectly. In this area, Chinh has led two funded studies to investigate public preferences and willingness to pay for Mobility as a Service (MaaS) in Sydney, Australia and Tyneside the UK, in partner with the Catapult network of world-leading centres.

Modelling group decisions is another research area that Chinh has continued to contribute to since completing his PhD. Group decisions are popular, but understanding is rare because few models have been designed for analysing group decisions. For this reason, Chinh’s work on extending McFadden’s random utility model to study group decisions has been recognised by world-leading researchers.

Selected publications

2019

Journal Articles

Hensher D, Balbontin C, Ho C, and Mulley C (2019) Cross-cultural contrasts of preferences for bus rapid transit and light rail transit Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, 53 (1), 47-73.

Zhang L, Hensher D, and Ho C (2019) Values of travel time savings from stated preference data and revealed preference data: an empirical investigation and comparison Transportation Letters: The International Journal of Transportation Research, In Press. [More Information]

Book Chapters

Hensher D, Balbontin C, Ho C, Mulley C, Macario R, and Stewart A (2019) Evaluating BRT and LRT on a level playing field in developed economies: A cross cultural comparison Bus Rapid Transit; Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, United Kingdom.

Hensher D, Ellison R, Ho C, and Weisbrod G (2019) How well does BRT perform in contrast to LRT? An Australian case study using MetroScan_TI Bus Rapid Transit; Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, United Kingdom.

2018

Journal Articles

Ho C, Hensher D, Mulley C, and Wong Y (2018) Potential uptake and willingness-to-pay for Mobility as a Service (MaaS): A stated choice study Transportation Research Part A, 117, 302-318. [More Information]

Mulley C, Ho C, Ho T, Hensher D, and Rose J (2018) Will bus travellers walk further for a more frequent service? An international study using a stated preference approach Transport Policy, 69, 88-97. [More Information]

Conference Proceeding

Mulley C, Ho C, Ho T, Hensher D, and Rose J (2018) Will bus travellers walk further for a more frequent service? An international study using a stated preference approach 97th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board TRB; Transportation Research Board Publications (TRB), Washington, D.C., United States.

2017

Journal Articles

Hensher D, Ho C, and Beck M (2017) A simplified and practical alternative way to recognise the role of household characteristics in determining an individual's preferences: the case of automobile choice Transportation, 44 (1), 225-240. [More Information]

Ho C, and Hensher D (2017) Application of irrelevance of state-wise dominated alternatives (ISDA) for identifying candidate processing strategies and behavioural choice rules adopted in best-worst stated preference studies Journal of Choice Modelling, 25, 40-49. [More Information]

Ho C, Hensher D, and Ellison R (2017) Endogenous treatment of residential location choices in transport and land use models: introducing the MetroScan framework Journal of Transport Geography, 64, 120-131. [More Information]

Ho C, Mulley C, Tsai C, Ison S, and Wiblin S (2017) Area-wide travel plans - targeting strategies for greater participation in green travel initiatives: a case study of Rouse Hill Town Centre, NSW Australia Transportation, 44 (2), 325-352. [More Information]

Conference Proceeding

Ho C, Hensher D, Mulley C, and Wong Y (2017) Prospects for switching out of conventional transport services to mobility as a service subscription plans: A stated choice study' 15th International Conference on Competition and Ownership in Land Passenger Transport- Thredbo 15, Stockholm, Sweden 13-17 August.

Book Chapter

Mulley C, and Ho C (2017) Understanding the Determinants of Walking as the Basis for Social Marketing Public Health Messaging Walking: Connecting Sustainable Transport with Health; Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, 41-59. [More Information]

2016

Journal Articles

Hensher D, and Ho C (2016) Identifying a behaviourally relevant choice set from stated choice data Transportation, 43 (2), 197-217. [More Information]

Hensher D, and Ho C (2016) Experience conditioning in commuter modal choice modelling - Does it make a difference? Transportation Research Part E - Logistics and Transportation Review, 95, 164-176. [More Information]

Hensher D, Greene B, and Ho C (2016) Random Regret Minimization and Random Utility Maximization in the Presence of Preference Heterogeneity: An Empirical Contrast Journal of Transportation Engineering, 142 (4), 1-10. [More Information]

Hensher D, Ho C, and Knowles L (2016) Efficient contracting and incentive agreements between regulators and bus operators: The influence of risk preferences of contracting agents on contract choice Transportation Research Part A, 87, 22-40. [More Information]

Hensher D, Ho C, and Liu W (2016) How much is too much for tolled road users: Toll saturation and the implications for car commuting value of travel time savings? Transportation Research Part A, 94, 604-621. [More Information]

Hensher D, Ho C, and Mulley C (2016) Disruption costs in bus contract transitions Research in Transportation Economics, 59, 75-85. [More Information]

Ho C, and Hensher D (2016) A workplace choice model accounting for spatial competition and agglomeration effects Journal of Transport Geography, 51, 193-203. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2016) Developing good practice outcomes in passenger transport: Strategic policy and practical implementation: Editorial Research in Transportation Business & Management, 20, 1-2. [More Information]

Ho C, Mulley C, Shiftan Y, and Hensher D (2016) Vehicle value of travel time savings: Evidence from a group-based modelling approach Transportation Research Part A, 88, 134-150. [More Information]

2015

Journal Articles

Hensher D, and Ho C (2015) The role of perceived acceptability of alternatives in identifying and assessing choice set processing strategies in stated choice settings: The case of road pricing reform Transportation Research Part E - Logistics and Transportation Review, 83, 225-237. [More Information]

Hensher D, Ho C, and Mulley C (2015) Identifying preferences for public transport investments under a constrained budget Transportation Research Part A, 72, 27-46. [More Information]

Hensher D, Ho C, and Mulley C (2015) Identifying resident preferences for bus-based and rail-based investments as a complementary buy in perspective to inform project planning prioritisation Journal of Transport Geography, 46, 1-9. [More Information]

Hensher D, Li Z, and Ho C (2015) The Role of Source Preference and Subjective Probability in Valuing Expected Travel Time Savings Travel Behaviour and Society, 2 (1), 42-54. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2015) Intra-household Interactions in tour-based mode choice: The role of social, temporal, spatial and resource constraints Transport Policy, 38, 52-63. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2015) Intra-household interactions in transport research: a review Transport Reviews, 35 (1), 33-55. [More Information]

Book Chapter

Ho C, and Hensher D (2015) Greening Demand Chains in Urban Passenger Transport: Emissions Saving from Complex Trip Chains Green Logistics and Transportation: A Sustainable Supply Chain Perspective; Springer, Cham, 131-146. [More Information]

2014

Journal Articles

Ho C, and Hensher D (2014) Housing prices and price endogeneity in tenure and dwelling type choice models Case Studies on Transport Policy, 2 (3), 107-115. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2014) Metrobuses in Sydney: How high capacity and high frequency services are benefiting the Metropolitan fringe Research in Transportation Economics, 48, 339-348. [More Information]

Book Chapter

Ison S, Mulley C, Mifsud A, and Ho C (2014) A Parking Space Levy: A Case Study of Sydney, Australia Parking Issues and Policies; Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, United Kingdom, 317-333. [More Information]

2013

Journal Articles

Ho C, and Mulley C (2013) Incorporating Intrahousehold Interactions into a Tour-Based Model of Public Transport Use in Car-Negotiating Households Transportation Research Record, 2343 (1), 1-9. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2013) Multiple purposes at single destination: A key to a better understanding of the relationship between tour complexity and mode choice Transportation Research Part A, 49, 206-219. [More Information]

Ho C, and Mulley C (2013) Tour-based mode choice of joint household travel patterns on weekend and weekday Transportation, 40 (4), 789-811. [More Information]

Mulley C, and Ho C (2013) Evaluating the impact of bus network planning changes in Sydney, Australia Transport Policy, 30, 13-25. [More Information]

Book

Ho C (2013) An investigation of intra-household interactions in travel mode choice; The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Conference Proceeding

Ho C, and Mulley C (2013) Group travel and public transport use: the effect of fare discounts 36th Australasian Transport Research Forum ATRF 2013; Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

2012

Conference Proceeding

Mulley C, and Ho C (2012) Evaluating the impact of bus network planning changes in Sydney, Australia 35th Australasian Transport Research Forum ATRF 2012; Department of Infrastructure and Transport, Perth, Australia.

Working Paper

Ho C, and Mulley C (2012) Multiple purposes at single destination: a key to a better understanding of the relationship between tour complexity and mode choice.

2011

Conference Proceeding

Ho C, and Yamamoto T (2011) The role of attitudes and public transport service on vehicle ownership in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam 34th Australasian Transport Research Forum ATRF 2011; Planning and Transport Research Centre (PATREC), Adelaide, Australia.

Selected grants

2017-2021

2016-2020

  • MetroScan-TI; Artemis High Performance Computing (HPC) Grand Challenge Scheme (Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research).

2016-2017

Recent Units Taught

  • BUSS6002 Data Science in Business

  • ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

  • ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

  • ITLS6106 Infrastructure Appraisal

  • ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

  • ITLS6107 GIS for Transport and Logistics

Newsroom articles

  • Dr Chinh Ho on Ten Sydney 09 Oct 2018

    Ten Sydney

    Ten Sydney and WIN (Canberra, Newcastle) interviewed Dr Chinh Ho from the Business School about his analysis of Opal ticketing data revealing Town Hall station is significantly busier in peak times than Central station.

  • Town Hall station overcrowding to force staff to slow access at peak 08 Oct 2018

    Sydney Morning Herald

    Sydney Morning Herald quoted Dr Chinh Ho from the Business School about his analysis of Opal ticketing data revealing Town Hall station is significantly busier in peak times than Central station. The article was syndicated across Fairfax Media online.

  • Chinh Ho on 2SM Sydney 22 Sep 2017

    2SM Sydney

    2SM Sydney interviewed Dr Chinh Ho about research into Australia’s attitudes towards self-driving cars, which would contribute to traffic congestion.

  • Autonomous Vehicles and Implications for Future Transport Systems 02 Feb 2017

    ITLS Thinking Outside the Box

    The rapid development of autonomous vehicles (AV) has prompted considerable speculation on how these vehicles will ‘revolutionise’ the future of cities’ transport systems. It has been suggested that a large-scale adoption of AV would lead to safer roads, congestion-free cities and more public spaces as vehicles can be shared, and hence fewer parking spaces are needed. However, it is far from clear if these visions are likely to be realised and what this might imply for the future transport networks and policy agendas. Read more

  • How we'll drive into the future 25 Nov 2016

    Sydney Morning Herald

    The Sydney Morning Herald quoted Postdoctoral Research Fellow Chinh Ho about whether the motoring trends of 2016 will still exist in ten years and discussed ride-sharing services such as Uber.

See all Newsroom items for Chinh Ho